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Apple Butter A Must For Fall-Sonia

As the cold envelops the outside world, warm up your kitchen with this simple-nosterilization of jars or water baths, yet satisfying process of making your own apple butter. And with Thanksgiving just around the corner, you will be able to hand these sweet little jars out to family and friends.

When looking through Jam it Pickle it Cure it by Karen Solomon I discovered this very simple and straightforward recipe. Noting her comments about roasting the apples, which intensifies their flavor and makes the finished product a rich Carmel color, it struck me how fun it would be to make our very own apple butter.

Even though I possessed a fondness for apple butter since I was very young, it was not until several years ago when making this recipe with a friend that I realized what a treasure I had found.

Since that first time I had the pleasure of enjoying this delicious creamy accompaniment to my homemade bread, I have continued to make apple butter for my family.

First you will want to gather and weigh out three different varieties of apples making up a total of 8lbs. In the past I have used different combinations, however this last time I created a very earthy and robust flavor by using Golden Delicious, Red Delicious, and Fuji.

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Peel, core and slice your apples.

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Place them on a buttered cookie sheet and roast for 2 hours at 350 degrees, rotating the cookie sheet half way through the roasting process.

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When they come out they will be a rich golden color.

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As you are waiting for your apples to finish roasting, proceed to gather your dry ingredients. This makes your next step a snap.

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Place your apples in a food processor and blend until completely smooth. A food processor makes this step so easy, but if you do not have one, use a blender instead.

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Each batch has a different consistency depending on the variety of apples, therefore, when I find the composition dry, I add a little apple cider or apple juice to the batch. Be cautious, though, when adding liquid. Remember, you can always add more, but you can never remove the excess.

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Then add your brown sugar, salt, cinnamon, cardamom, and allspice. I have only used the allspice once. I prefer to make my own combination of this spice by adding cloves and freshly grated nutmeg along with the cinnamon. Ah, I can smell the aroma of these wonderful spices even as I write about them.

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My mother never liked nutmeg until we started grating our own. As described in The Gift of Southern Cooking, store bought nutmeg tends to taste like sawdust, whereas freshly grated nutmeg tastes fresh as it should.

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Blend these spices together and add to your apple mixture until it becomes a creamy consistency.

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Next add your freshly squeezed lemon juice, and pulse until incorporated.

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Transfer to three or four thoroughly cleaned and dried pint size jars. Then slather some on a fresh baked piece of bread and enjoy!

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Apple Butter

From Jam it, pickle it, cure it

8 pounds of apples

2 T lemon juice

1/3 c golden brown sugar

1 t salt

2 t ground cinnamon

t allspice (My versions:1/8 to t ground cloves and to t nutmeg freshly grated)

t cardamom